Guitar Solo Scales

Learning to play Guitar Solo Scales can be confusing at first, but once you learn some basic techniques and guitar scales, you can solo to virtually any song. Before you try to become an expert at guitar solos, It is important that you have a basic understanding of guitar chords, guitar tab and music theory. Mastering the guitar can take years, so diligence is critical. When all else fails, consider taking guitar lessons; you can work one-on-one with an expert who can monitor your skill level and focus on your weaknesses. Here’s On Guitar Solo Scales :
Find a slow song you enjoy that allows room for guitar solos or a song that already incorporates a guitar solo. A good example is “Wonderful Tonight” by Eric Clapton; it incorporates a repeating signature guitar riff and contains a very basic chord structure. A blues or classic rock song is probably best, as they typically follow standard structures and chords.
Determine the key of the song. You can usually find the key of the song at the beginning of any sheet music or guitar tab. If the key is not noted, the key is usually the starting chord of the song. For example, “Wonderful Tonight” starts on G major and is in the key of G major. Remember, this is not true in all cases; however, it is very common in popular music. Learning this step by ear will take extra practice.
If the song is in a major key, locate the relative minor note. For example, “Wonderful Tonight” is in the key of G major, which has a relative minor of E minor. If the song is already in a minor key, for example, C minor (often written Cm or C-), you can omit this step. To figure out the relative minor of the song, refer to the major scale of the key; the sixth note of the major scale is the relative minor root. You can use this simple chart to get started.
Find the relative Guitar Solo Scales minor note on the 6th string (E string). This is your root note and starting point for the minor pentatonic scale. For example, if you are soloing over “Wonderful Tonight,” you would start in the open position or on the 12th fret. If the song was in A major, you would start on the 2nd fret. Keep in mind, this only relates to the first position pentatonic scale and you do not have to start in this position; it is simply a good starting point for beginners. As you advance, you can start your soloing anywhere on the neck.Attempt playing the notes of the Guitar Solo Scales over your song choice. The notes should sound like they blend with the song. The notes can be played in any order, but you will notice it sounds best when the starting note is played in accompaniment with the current chord.Practice the same technique over different songs in different keys and different tempos.Learn every note on the 6th string and attempt to learn all of the notes on every string; it will help you locate the root notes of the scales quickly, increasing your soloing range and speed. It will also help you understand how scales work.Master the first position of the minor pentatonic before moving on to other scales and nodes. The first position is used most often and it will boost your confidence. In addition, you could never learn another scale and still be able to solo to practically any song with this single scale structure.

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